Writers

Rooted In Diversity: Jaime Garcia Dias

Rio de Janeiro is a huge, sprawling metropolis with a massive statue of Christ overseeing the poor and the rich alike. From the “ghetto” conditions of Cuidad De Deus, the City of God–about which some profound literature and film have been devoted–to the downtown rich glitz playing host to Carnivale every year, Rio has a diversity unlike any other in the world. Born in that diversity seventy years into the twentieth century, Jaime Garcia Dias very soon translated the whirlwind of activity around him into some of the finest literature Brazil has ever seen, and even a popular video series on Vimeo.

Dias’ parents were very educated individuals, and that’s really saying something in Rio. There are very well-educated people that have a decent economic foothold in society. There are also those that come from a background without education, and continue thus throughout their lives. Because of the economic climate of Brazil in the seventies, when Dias was born, it’s almost a miracle he wasn’t one of the unfortunate uneducated statistics of the sprawling city. It is unthinkable that he would not have observed these elements of society growing up; and indeed his literature reflects the truth of the region. Perhaps this is a reason for its profound popularity.

Whatever the case, Dias’ educated upbringing as shown on LinkedIn, definitely had a hand in his writing. Dias’ father was a well-known writer already, and his mother an architect with some very well-liked projects to recommend her. With Rio and his parents shaping his psyche, Dias soon embarked on a literary quest, starting his first novel at the tender age of fifteen.

While many aspiring authors start writing young, Dias is one of the few who was able to do as much successfully. By the age of forty-five, he has managed to publish some twenty different novels on a variety of subject matter. And he didn’t stop at literature, either. Dias became an educator in 1995, teaching students out of high school how to write professionally. He soon became president of the same educational institution, and continues writing to this day. His most recent work is compiled from articles that were written weekly over the course of a year. The articles mainly described his upbringing and childhood in Rio, and the book compiling them was well-received.

It requires education and diversity to produce well-balanced literature which is enjoyable for a variety of readers. Dias has this diverse balance, and the education to not only translate his vision for readers everywhere, but to teach prospective writers how to do the same thing. There’s a reason Dias is instrumental to the Brazilian literature scene: his work demands it. Furthermore, being at his career’s height, Dias doubtless has many works to come and his CrunchBase continues to be updated with new career news about the man.